Please log in, or sign up for a new account and purchase a subscription to continue reading.
Please log in, or sign up for a new account to continue reading.
Thank you for reading! We hope that you continue to enjoy our free content.
Welcome!
Log in or read 2 more articles before registering, and 8 before becoming a member.
Thank you for reading! On your next view you will be asked to log in or create an account to continue reading.
Thank you for reading! On your next view you will be asked to log in to your registered account or create an account to receive 6 more articles over the next 30 days.join now for unlimited access.
Share unlimited digital access with 4 family members… join now.
Thank you for reading! To continue reading your local news, please register for free. Or join for unlimited access. (Already a member? Log in.)
Thank you for reading! To continue reading your local news, please register for free. Or join for unlimited access. (Already a member? Log in.)
Local news and analysis – and much more. By joining you get unlimited access to it all.Join now.
Share unlimited digital access with 4 family members… join now.
Thank you for reading! To continue reading your local news, please register for free. Or join for unlimited access. (Already a member? Log in.)
Checking back? Since you viewed this item previously you can read it again.
Please log in, or sign up for a new account and purchase a subscription to continue reading.
Please purchase a subscription to continue reading.
Your current subscription does not provide access to this content.
You get home delivery Monday through Saturday – plus full digital access any time, on any device – with our six-day subscription delivery membership.
This membership plan includes member-only benefits like our popular ticket giveaways, all of our email newsletters and access to the daily digital replica of the printed paper. Also, you can share digital access with up to four other household members at no additional cost.
Subscriptions renew automatically every 30 days. Call 240-215-8600 to cancel auto-renewal. Most subscribers are served by News-Post carriers; households in some outlying areas receive same-day delivery through the US Postal Service. If your household falls in a postal delivery area, you will be notified by our customer service team.
With our four-day Wednesday-through-Saturday home delivery package, you get home delivery of our popular Food and 72 Hours sections as well as the full Saturday-Sunday weekend paper.
And, as with all of our packages, you get full access to all of our online content, any day and on any device.
Membership includes access to newsletters, special offers and the ability to share your subscription with up to four additional household members.
Subscriptions renew automatically every 30 days. Call 240-215-8600 to cancel auto-renewal. Most subscribers are served by News-Post carriers; households in some outlying areas receive same-day delivery through the US Postal Service. If your household falls in a postal delivery area, you will be notified by our customer service team.
With a digital-only membership subscription, you get individual access to all of our online content, 24/7, on any device.
Digital memberships qualify for special member benefits, like our popular ticket giveaways.
Plus you get access to the ePages, a digital replica of the printed paper, and all of our email newsletters.
Subscriptions renew automatically every 30 days. Call 240-215-8600 to cancel auto-renewal.
Our short-term pass is the digital equivalent of buying a couple of papers at the corner store. You can access all of our digital content for 48 hours with each non-renewing pass.
Sorry, no member giveaways, custom newsletters, linked accounts or ePages access with short-term passes.
Sorry, no promotional deals were found matching that code.
Promotional Rates were found for your code.
Sorry, an error occurred.

do not remove
Chikitaki, led by Aurea Urteaga, middle, performs a children’s show at the 14th annual Latino Festival at The Frederick Community College Athletic Center on Sunday.

Reporter
Chikitaki, led by Aurea Urteaga, middle, performs a children’s show at the 14th annual Latino Festival at The Frederick Community College Athletic Center on Sunday.
Men waved their sombreros and women flapped their colorful skirts as they danced “Jarabe Tapatío,” or the Mexican hat dance, Sunday afternoon at the 14th Annual Latino Festival.
“Jarabe Tapatío” is the national dance of Mexico, and at Frederick Community College, spectators were clapping and some were dancing along as they watched the pairs weave through each other.
“We would like to have everybody to join with us, not just the Latino community, but we want to invite everybody to be here all together and enjoy all the different things that this melting pot allows us to have,” Ana Maria Pinzon, an organizer, said.
The festival’s date is purposely chosen to be in line with Hispanic Heritage Month, one of the festival’s organizers Jeanie Cronin, 72, said. Every year, they try to showcase as much as they could of Latino and Hispanic culture, from vendors to food to music.
It’s not just for Latino-Hispanic heritage to be celebrated, she said, but for non-Latinos as well, so they can learn and appreciate Latino culture, Cronin said.
Visitors munched on elotes — Mexican street corn smothered in a mayonnaise-like sauce, cheese, chili powder and lime — as they meandered around the campus. Music blasted as they sought shelter from the sun under trees and stands.
Under one such stand, Cynthia Sorto, 38, was selling trinkets, clothes and jewelry from her business Lunniaya Arts and Crafts. They are all inspired by Mexican and Mayan culture, she said. Sorto works with different types of clay to make her wares, as well as paint. Her mother makes bracelets.
On a jean jacket and hanging around her stand were brightly colored skulls decorated with floral designs known as Mexican sugar skulls. She said she really wanted to showcase them, since, in her words, Mexican culture is more than things like tacos.
“That is something that I would like to share and you know, have people understand the real meaning that it is something very spiritual and has nothing to do with evil or anything like that,” she said.
And that uniqueness of her Mexican heritage was what made the Latino festival important, she said. “Latino” is a big umbrella to describe a large group of people, but with each country comes a different culture, she said.
A trio of friends visiting from Washington, D.C., agreed. Tereca McFadden, Carmen Hernández and Patricia Torres were visiting the festival during their day trip to Frederick. McFadden is from Bolivia, and Hernandez and Torres are from Venezuela.
While they enjoyed the general ambiance of the festival, they said it was very much centered around Central American culture. However, they understood that it could be difficult for every Latin American country to be showcased.
“I liked that there are more and more Latino festivals, but at the same time, people think that ‘Latino’ is a concept and ‘Latino’ is so [many] different personalities,” Torres said. “And there are things we all have in common, but at the same time, we are all different.”
In the background, the bright oranges, pinks and purples of the traditional Mexican dances gave way to the clean, blue and white dresses of El Salvador. The women performed “El Sombrero Azul,” another traditional dance.
Sandra Oblitas, director of Kasandra Cultural Center and was performing the dances, said they tried to pick the dances and songs that were most emblematic of different Latino countries.
They also performed bachata, salsa and merengue as they invited audience members to dance along and learn. The group was proud to perform, she said, especially since they could educate people about other cultures through what Oblitas thought was the best way: movement and dance.
And that could be seen in the dancing group itself, she said. Some of the dancers weren’t Latino or were from other countries than where the traditional dance was from, she said.
“We have other guys that are from different countries from Latin America, but at that time when they had to represent Mexico, for instance, they became, you know, from that country and they tried to represent it the most,” she said.
And music is one of the unifiers when it comes to Latino culture, Jenaro Melendez said. An Ellicott City resident and a Puerto Rico native, Melendez made his first trip to the festival on Sunday.
He was lounging with a snow cone as he mentioned he saw a classmate way back from when he went to school in Puerto Rico.
Like Torres, he emphasized the individuality of his homeland, like the salsa music, but he also noted how Latino culture is connected. 
“Every country has different traditions, but the principle things is music, the language and the food…” Melendez said. 
Follow Clara Niel on Twitter: @clarasniel
Reporter
{{description}}
Email notifications are only sent once a day, and only if there are new matching items.
Your comment has been submitted.

Reported
There was a problem reporting this.
Log In
Keep it clean. No vulgar, racist, sexist or sexually-oriented language.
Engage ideas. This forum is for the exchange of ideas, not personal attacks or ad hominem criticisms.
TURN OFF CAPS LOCK.
Be civil. Don't threaten. Don't lie. Don't bait. Don't degrade others.
No trolling. Stay on topic.
No spamming. This is not the place to sell miracle cures.
No deceptive names. Apparently misleading usernames are not allowed.
Say it once. No repetitive posts, please.
Help us. Use the 'Report' link for abusive posts.

Please log in, or sign up for a new account and purchase a subscription to read or post comments.
The need for telework and human resource management is growing. With more and more offices going remote in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, telework managers play an important role. Also, with the current turmoil over whether employees shou…
Looking to hire in Frederick? Reach jobseekers in print and online. Email recruitment@newspost.com.
Keep the conversation about local news & events going by joining us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Recent updates from The News-Post and also from News-Post staff members are compiled below.
Our local business directory includes detailed information for featured businesses as well as customer reviews and direct links to related events.
Stay informed of daily news & events in your community for as little as $3.25 a week.
Become a Member
The Frederick News-Post is printed by FNP Printing and Publishing.

source

Shop Sephari