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In addition to dancers from a variety of folk traditions, the Cville Sabroso Festival will offer Latin American music, children’s activities, foods and a variety of vendors.
Saturday’s Cville Sabroso Festival will bring music and dance traditions from Mexico, Bolivia, Peru, Venezuela and Puerto Rico to Charlottesville’s Booker T. Washington Park.
CHARLOTTESVILLE—The return of the annual Cville Sabroso Festival gives Charlottesville residents a chance to savor Latin American culture and learn more about the area’s vibrant, diverse Latinx population.
Presented by Sin Barreras (Without Barriers) and The LUA Project, the festival is back after a pandemic-fueled pause with folkloric dancing from Mexico, Puerto Rico, Bolivia, Peru and Venezuela, as well as music, foods, beverages and products representing numerous nations.
The festival will take place from 2 to 9 p.m. Saturday in Booker T. Washington Park, giving the whole community a chance to come together.
“For us, it is continued healing and connecting with different groups,” said Edgar Lara, executive director of Sin Barreras and one of the event’s organizers. The 2017 festival took place about a month after the violence after the Unite the Right rally on Aug. 12, 2017, and “so many people found this event just what they were looking for.”
From fresh foods prepared by local businesses to energetic music and dance, the volunteer-powered festival gives visitors a chance to learn more about the different Latin American cultures that help enrich life in Charlottesville.
“I think, oftentimes, people have an idea of what Charlottesville and this community is like,” Lara said. “They may not realize the Hispanic community is here, too.”
The Cville Sabroso Festival “was just tiny” when it got its start in 2012 at McGuffey Art Center, Lara said. As it grew, the festival moved to IX Art Park.
Sin Barreras, a Charlottesville-based nonprofit that works to empower immigrants and their families, has a second office in Waynesboro. The organization focuses on providing education, advocacy and support to Central Virginia’s Latinx population.
As exciting as it is to enjoy the pageantry of the colorfully garbed guest dance ensembles on special occasions, Lara said he’d love to see more local people in the Latinx community forming folkloric dance groups right here.
“One thing that I think is pretty cool is the folk dancing,” he said. “I hope it will inspire the younger generation to appreciate the folk dances. We hope that more people will be inspired to form their own groups.”
Admission is free. To learn more, go to sinbarrerascville.org.
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In addition to dancers from a variety of folk traditions, the Cville Sabroso Festival will offer Latin American music, children’s activities, foods and a variety of vendors.
Saturday’s Cville Sabroso Festival will bring music and dance traditions from Mexico, Bolivia, Peru, Venezuela and Puerto Rico to Charlottesville’s Booker T. Washington Park.
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