Frederica Antonio; photo Gabriella Marks, courtesy of SWAIA
Tyler Glasses, Poncho for Days (2021), Navajo churro wool; photo Daniel Nadelbach, courtesy of SWAIA
Cody Sanderson with his gold and silver jewelry (2021); photo Shayla Blatchford Photography, courtesy of SWAIA 
Dress by designer Lauren Good Day; courtesy of SWAIA
Karis Jackson with examples of her bead and quillwork (2021); courtesy of SWAIA
Two-dimensional artist Bryan Waytula (2017); photo Gabriella Marks, courtesy of SWAIA

Staff Writer
Frederica Antonio; photo Gabriella Marks, courtesy of SWAIA
Tyler Glasses, Poncho for Days (2021), Navajo churro wool; photo Daniel Nadelbach, courtesy of SWAIA
Cody Sanderson with his gold and silver jewelry (2021); photo Shayla Blatchford Photography, courtesy of SWAIA 
Dress by designer Lauren Good Day; courtesy of SWAIA
Karis Jackson with examples of her bead and quillwork (2021); courtesy of SWAIA
Two-dimensional artist Bryan Waytula (2017); photo Gabriella Marks, courtesy of SWAIA
Born at Acoma Pueblo in 1968, Frederica Antonio began learning to make pottery at age 17 from her future mother-in-law, renowned potter Mildred Antonio. Frederica Antonio’s hand-coiled polychrome pots are thin walled and painted with intricate, all-over linear and geometric patterns. It can take the artist weeks to complete a pot because of the elaborate surface decoration. Antonio gathers her clay and the natural pigments used for the paint by hand in the vicinity of Acoma. Each piece is painted in warm, earthen colors, using a traditional brush made from yucca fibers. She starts her surface decorations with a series of fine vertical and horizontal lines and fills in sections to create her design patterns, all of which she renders by hand with machine-like precision.
Diné weaver Tyler Glasses learned to weave from his grandmother Nellie Glasses. The 33-year-old from Rock Point, Arizona, has been exhibiting, alongside his sister, Naiomi Glasses, at Santa Fe Indian Market since 2020, when the market was held virtually. Navajo weavings, such as the chief blankets and other designs woven by Glasses, are made using hand-gathered wool of the domestic Churro sheep and dyed using natural, hand-gathered pigments. Navajo upright looms are typically set up outdoors, with the vertical warp strung between logs suspended between trees or a wooden frame. Traditionally, Navajo weavings are utilitarian and include such items as blankets used as dresses, saddle blankets, cloaks, and similar items. Weavings were increasingly marketed to tourists and sold as decorative items starting in the late 19th century. Glasses won the Best of Classification award in textiles at the 2021 Indian Market (his first in-person market) for an elongated poncho he designed, called Poncho for Days, using traditional weaving methods.
Born in Gallup, New Mexico, in 1964 and raised in Window Rock, Arizona, Cody Sanderson began making jewelry in 1999. Known for his bold, graphic designs and ubiquitous use of star motifs, Sanderson’s jewelry is meant not just to be worn but to be seen. Using hands-on techniques such as stamping, forging, casting, and finishing, he crafts contemporary designs that reflect an Indigenous aesthetic. A mostly self-taught silversmith, Sanderson’s been exhibiting at Santa Fe Indian Market since 2002. Early blacksmithing took off among Navajo and Pueblo peoples in the 19th century. By 1850, regional tribes were engaged in blacksmithing for commercial purposes. As trading posts proliferated across the Navajo Nation in the 19th and 20th centuries, it helped introduce Navajo silversmithing to a wider audience of collectors.
Sought after fashion designer Lauren Good Day is an enrolled member of the Three Affiliated Tribes (Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara Nation) of the Ft. Berthold Reservation in North Dakota. An artist since age 6, Good Day began her career in textile art with beadwork and making tribal regalia before expanding into quillwork, ledger drawings, rawhide parfleche, and fashion design. Good Day is a graduate of the Indigenous Studies program at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe and lives in her home state of North Dakota. Her fashions are vibrant, colorful, and contemporary, and inspired by Indigenous design elements. Her Summer 2022 collection, which includes sundresses, skirts, graphic tees, beaded flat bags, and jackets, reflects the cultural influence of the peoples of the Northern Plains.
Quill and beadworker Karis Jackson uses the geometrical designs of the Crow on elk hides and other traditional materials for a range of wearable designs and ceremonial regalia. She incorporates innovative designs into her work, such as portraits of her ancestors and other detailed representational imagery. Her first beadwork design, which she made as a child, was a small flower for a pair of baby moccasins. Later, the moccasins would be worn by both of her daughters. Jackson learned beading techniques from her grandmother Kathy Real Bird. Native quillwork, which she also works in, predates the use of commercial beads. Much quillwork was supplanted after glass beads were introduced to the Americas by Europeans. Both art forms are practiced today, but quillwork, which involves risks if obtaining the quills from live porcupines (they release the sharp quills as a defense mechanism) is a less common practice and the subject of a current artistic revival.
Sand Springs, Oklahoma, artist Bryan Waytula continues the artistic traditions established by his mother, Kansas basketmaker and Cherokee National Treasure Vivian Garner Cottrell. A two-dimensional artist, Waytula paints using a variety of techniques, including pointillism, in which he varies the sizes of the circles and dots used in the formation of his realist compositions, which he invests with a graphic pop aesthetic. Waytula’s mother and grandmother, Betty Scraper Garner (also a Cherokee National Treasure), introduced the artist to traditional Cherokee basket weaving with honeysuckle vines when he was young. Unable to get the hang of it, he preferred to draw and paint. A graduate of Oklahoma’s Northeastern State University with a degree in education, he spent 13 years as an educator before devoting himself full time to art.
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